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Italian Prawns

The prawn -- 5 lbs. (2.25 kg)
Raw prawn must be used.  Medium to large sized prawn work best.  The expensive colossal size will offer no advantage.  Peel the prawn, leaving the tail fins attached.  Devein the prawn if you wish.  Rinse in cold water and drain.  Place the prawn on a paper towel; blot them to remove excess water.  Refrigerate while preparing the marinade.
THE MARINADE for 5 lbs. (2.25 kg) of prawn

  • 1 cup (240 ml) olive oil
  • 1/2 cup (120 ml) lemon juice
  • 1/4 cup (60 ml) onion, minced
  • 1/4 cup (60 ml) tomato catsup
  • 2 Tbsp. (30 ml) oregano powder
  • 5 tsp. (25 ml) Bradley Sugar Cure    (Do not use more than this amount.)
  • 2 tsp. (10 ml) garlic, minced or grated
  • 1 tsp. (5 ml) white pepper, finely ground
  • 8 drops of hot sauce

Note: If the meat weighs either more or less than 5 pounds (2.25 kg), the amount of marinade used must be proportional to that weight.  For example, if the weight of the meat is 2 1/2 pounds (1.15 kg), then each ingredient, including the Bradley Cure, needs to be cut in half.

  1. In a curing container (food container) large enough to hold the prawn, combine all of the marinade ingredients.  Mix well.
  2. Add the prawn, and marinate in the refrigerator throughout the day and overnight.  Stir from time to time.
  3. Smoke at about 200° F (93º C).  After about 30 minutes, taste a prawn for doneness.  Do not overcook.  Overcooking prawn will cause them to become rubbery. 

Note: If the salt taste is too mild, the next time you make this product, add about 1 teaspoon of salt to the ingredients list.  If the salt taste is too strong, reduce the amount of Bradley Cure by about 1 teaspoon.
Instructions prepared by Warren R. Anderson, author of Mastering the Craft of Smoking Food.

 

German Sausage

Using Beef or Wild Game
The casings

Soak fibrous casings in water for 30 minutes prior to using.  If you are using 2 1/2 inch (6.4 cm) diameter casings that are about 12 inches (30 cm) long, four of them will be required. 

The meat

Using a 3/16-inch (4.8-mm) plate, grind 3 pounds (1360 g) of well-chilled beef, venison, elk, or moose.  Game meat should be trimmed of all fat before grinding.  Next, grind 1 pound (450 g) of lean pork with 1 pound (450 g) of pork fat.  Pass all the meat through the grinder twice if you want it to be finer.  Chill the meat thoroughly. 

Seasonings and other ingredients for 5 lbs. (2.25 kg)

  • 7 1/2 tsp. (45 ml) Bradley Sugar Cure
  • (Do not use more than this amount.)
  • 2 tsp. (10 ml) black pepper, finely ground
  • 1 tsp. (5 ml) salt (optional -- see below)
  • 1 tsp. (5 ml) mustard seed, ground
  • 1 tsp. (5 ml) celery seed, ground
  • 1 tsp. (5 ml) garlic powder
  • 1/2 tsp. (2.5 ml) coriander
  • 1/2 tsp. (2.5 ml) nutmeg
  • 1/2 cup (120 ml) chilled water
  • 1 cup (240 ml) finely powdered skim milk

Note: If the meat weighs either more or less than 5 pounds (2.25 kg), the amount of cure mix applied must be proportional to that weight.  For example, if the weight of the meat is 2 1/2 pounds (1.15 kg), then each ingredient, including the Bradley Cure, needs to be cut in half.

  1. Mix the Bradley Sugar Cure, seasoning, water, and the powdered milk in a large bowl until the ingredients are uniform.  (For a normal salt taste, add the optional 1 teaspoon of salt; for a mild salt taste, omit the salt.)
  2. Add the meat to the seasoning mixture and blend well by kneading for about 3 minutes. 
  3. Stuff the sausage into fibrous casings.  Insert the cable probe of an electronic thermometer in the open end of one of the sausages, and close the casing around the probe with butcher’s twine. 
  4. Refrigerate the stuffed sausages overnight.

Smoking

Remove the sausage from the refrigerator, and place it in a smoker that has been heated to 150° F (65° C).  Maintain this temperature with no smoke until the casing is dry to the touch.  (Alternatively, dry the casing in front of an electric fan.)  Raise the temperature to 160° F (71° C), and smoke the sausage for 3 to 6 hours.  If you wish to cook the sausage in the smoker, raise the temperature to 180° F (82° C) and hot smoke until the internal temperature is 160° F (71° C).
Refrigerate overnight before using. 
Instructions prepared by Warren R. Anderson, author of Mastering the Craft of Smoking Food.

Lamb Ham

Smoked leg of lamb is part of the Icelandic culture:
About 90% of the households serve smoked leg of lamb on Christmas day.
The following product is not authentic Icelandic smoked leg of lamb; we would probably not like it because it is hard cured and smoked with sheep dung.  The product described here will be mildly cured.

The raw material

For this product, a boned and butterflied leg of lamb is required.  Buy a small leg of lamb, and ask the butcher to butterfly it for you.  Get the sirloin half of the leg (the upper half), not the shank half (the lower half).  When it is butterflied, the meat will lie flat, and the thickness will usually be 1 to 2 1/2 inches (2.5 to 6.3 cm).
Boned leg of lamb is easy to buy.  If you need to butterfly it yourself, it is not hard to do.  Put the boned leg on the counter with the skin side down.  The meat will be thin in the middle where the bone was removed, but it will be thick to the left and right.  Hold the knife horizontally, parallel with the top surface of the counter.  Cut the middle of one of the thick parts almost to the outside edge, and open the meat, as you would open a book.  Do the same with the thick part on the other side.
The leg of lamb is now butterflied -- you now have one large slab of lamb.  To make it easier to process, it is best to cut it into 2 or 4 smaller slabs.
Most of the fat should be removed.  If the skin side of the meat has parchment-like membrane on it, it should be removed.  This membrane is called fell, and it will make the meat taste gamy.  Normally, the fell is removed by the meat processor before it is shipped to the retailer. 

Curing

The total curing time depends on the thickness of the thickest part of the butterfly.  Allow 7 days of curing time for every inch (2.5 cm) of thickness.

CURE MIX FOR 5 LBS. (2.25 KG) OF LEG OF LAMB

  • 3 Tbsp. (45 ml) Bradley Sugar Cure
  • (Do not use more than this amount.)
  • 1 Tbsp. (15 ml) garlic powder
  • 2 tsp. (10 ml) onion powder
  • 1 tsp. (5 ml) oregano powder
  • 1 tsp. (5 ml) black pepper
  • 1/2 tsp. (2.5 ml) thyme powder
  • 1/2 tsp. (2.5 ml) rosemary powder

Note: If the meat weighs either more or less than 5 pounds (2.25 kg), the amount of cure mix applied must be proportional to that weight.  For example, if the weight of the meat is 2 1/2 pounds (1.15 kg), then each ingredient, including the Bradley Cure, needs to be cut in half.

  1. Weigh the slabs of lamb.  Prepare and measure the required amount of Bradley Sugar Cure and seasoning ingredients.
  2. Place the lamb in a curing container (a large food container).  Rub the curing mix evenly on the meat.  Cover the lamb, and refrigerate.  The refrigerator temperature should be set between 34º and 40º F (2.2º to 4.4º C). 
  3. Overhaul the pieces of lamb after about 12 hours of curing.  (Overhaul means to rub the surface of the meat to redistribute the curing mixture.) 
  4. Overhaul the meat about once a day for the first week, and then overhaul every other day until the required curing time has elapsed.
  5. the curing is finished, rinse each piece of lamb very well in lukewarm water.  Drain.  Wrap each piece in a paper towel, and then wrap again with newspaper.  Refrigerate overnight. 

Smoking the lamb

  1. Place the slabs on smoking racks with the skin side down.  Dry the surface in front of an electric fan, or dry at about 140º F (60º C) in the smoker until the surface feels dry (about an hour).  Do not use smoke during the drying period. 
  2. When the meat is dry on the surface, cold smoke it at the lowest possible temperature for 3 to 6 hours.  Raise the temperature of the smoker to about 145º F (63º C), and smoke the lamb until it takes on a reddish-brown color (about 2 hours).  Remove the meat from the smoker. 

Cooking the lamb

The lamb is not fully cooked when comes out of the smoker.  It needs to be cooked by any conventional method used to cook meat.  Roasting in an oven until the internal temperature is 170° F (76.6° C) is probably the best option.

Note: If the salt taste is too mild, the next time you make this product, add about 1 teaspoon of salt to the ingredients list.  If the salt taste is too strong, reduce the amount of Bradley Cure by about 1 teaspoon.

Instructions prepared by Warren R. Anderson, author of Mastering the Craft of Smoking Food.

 

 

Pastrami - Beef or Wild Game

Inexpensive cuts of meat are usually used to make pastrami.  Almost any cut of beef or wild game can be used, but the most common cuts are beef brisket, plate, tri-tip, and shoulder.  To be authentic, pastrami must be smoked. 
Pastrami is thoroughly cooked.  Depending on the processor, it is steamed, hot smoked, boiled, oven roasted, or possibly even grilled.  (A modified form of hot water cooking is one of the methods suggested below, but other methods may be employed.  Hot smoking can cause excessive drying.  Oven roasting, too, can cause excessive drying unless precautions are taken.)

The meat

Exceedingly fat meat, or exceedingly lean meat (beef round, for example), should be avoided. 

  1. Cut off loose flesh, and remove bloody spots and gristle to the extent possible.  Remove excess fat.
  2. Cut the meat into the sizes that you want to process.  Remember that thick meat requires longer curing time.
  3. Rinse all of the pieces of meat in cold water, and drain them in a colander.  Blot them with a paper towel.  Place the meat in the curing container(s) (plastic food containers) you will use, and refrigerate it while the cure mix is being readied.

Curing

Measure the thickest hunk, and allow 6 days of curing time for every inch (2.5 cm) of thickness.

PASTRAMI CURE MIX FOR 5 LBS. (2.5 KG) OF MEAT

  • 3 Tbsp. (45 ml) Bradley Sugar Cure
  • (Do not use more than this amount.)
  • 2 tsp. (10 ml) garlic powder
  • 2 tsp. (10 ml) onion powder
  • 1 tsp. (5 ml) red pepper
  • 1 tsp. (5 ml) white pepper
  • 1 tsp. (5 ml) oregano
  • 1 tsp. (5 ml) paprika
  • 1/2 tsp. (2.5 ml) allspice
  • 1/2 tsp. (2.5 ml) powdered ginger
  • (A small amount of light corn syrup and coarsely ground pepper are also required.)

Note: If the meat weighs either more or less than 5 pounds (2.25 kg), the amount of cure mix applied must be proportional to that weight.  For example, if the weight of the meat is 2 1/2 pounds (1.15 kg), then each ingredient, including the Bradley Cure, needs to be cut in half.

  1. Weigh the meat.  If more than one curing container will be used, calculate separately the total weight of the meat that will be placed in each container.  Prepare, calculate, and measure the required amount of curing mixture for each container.
  2. Place the meat in the curing container(s).  Rub the cure mix on all surfaces evenly.  Cover and refrigerate.  The refrigerator temperature should be set between 34º and 40º F (2.2º to 4.4º C).
  3. Overhaul the pieces of meat after about 12 hours of curing.  (Overhaul means to rub the surfaces of the meat to redistribute the cure.)  Be sure to wet the meat with any liquid that may have accumulated in the bottom of the curing container.
  4. Overhaul the meat about every other day until the required curing time has elapsed.
  5. When the curing is finished, rinse each piece of meat very well in lukewarm water.  Drain in a colander, and blot with a paper towel.
  6. Use a basting brush to “paint” each piece of pastrami with light corn syrup, or honey diluted with a little water (this will help the pepper stick to the meat).  Wait a few minutes to allow the surface become tacky.  Sprinkle and press on coarsely ground pepper. 
  7. Refrigerate overnight.

Traditional Smoking and Cooking

  1. Hang the pieces in the smoke chamber, or place them on smoking racks.  Dry at about 140º F (60º C) until the surface is dry (about an hour).  Do not use smoke during the drying period.
  2. To avoid excessive drying and excessively dark coloration, smoke at less than 85º F (30º C), if possible.  Smoke the pastrami for 3 to 6 hours, depending on how smoky you want the meat.  Raise the temperature to about 145º F (63º C) for an hour or two toward the end of the smoking time if darker coloration is desired. 

Raise Temperature of smoker to 320º F (160º C) and cook with no smoke until the pastrami is done when the internal temperature is 170° F (77° C).  2-3 hours and use an electronic meat thermometer with a cable probe to monitor the internal temperature. 

Note: If the salt taste is too mild, the next time you make pastrami, add about 1 teaspoon of salt to the ingredients list.  If the salt taste is too strong, reduce the amount of Bradley Cure by about 1 teaspoon.

Instructions prepared by Warren R. Anderson, author of Mastering the Craft of Smoking Food.

 

Pastrami Sausage (Beef or Wild Game)

This sausage was created by using the same seasoning that is used for pastrami.  Beef is the traditional raw material.  However, because pastrami is a well-seasoned product, the spices and herbs in this sausage will mute the gamey taste of big game, if you choose to use such meat instead of beef. 

The casings

Fibrous casings about 2 1/2 inch (6.4 cm) in diameter are suggested for this sausage.  Four casings that are about 12 inches (30 cm) long will be required.  Soak the casings in water for 30 minutes before stuffing. 

The meat -- beef or wild game

Use 5 pounds (2.25 kg) of fatty ground chuck.  You could also use 4 pounds (1800 g) of lean beef and 1 pound (450 g) of pork fat if you have only lean beef on hand. 
Another option for the raw material would be venison, bear, elk, or moose.  Wild game meat that has been trimmed of all fat and mixed with an equal amount of fatty pork would make an excellent product.  Alternatively, rather than using 50% fatty pork, 75% well trimmed game and 25% pure pork fat could be used. 
Mince the meat with a 3/16-inch (4.8-mm) plate.  Refrigerate. 

seasonings and other ingredients for 5 lbs. (2.25 kg)

  • 7 1/2 tsp. (37.5 ml) Bradley Sugar Cure
  •    (Do not use more than this amount.)
  • 1 tsp. (5 ml) salt (optional -- see step #1 below)
  • 4 tsp. (20 ml) light corn syrup
  • 4 tsp. (20 ml) black peppercorns, cracked
  • 1 tsp. (5 ml) onion powder
  • 1 tsp. (5 ml) garlic powder
  • 1/2 tsp. (2.5 ml) cayenne
  • 1/2 tsp. (2.5 ml) paprika
  • 1/2 tsp. (2.5 ml) oregano
  • 1/4 tsp. (1.25 ml) allspice
  • 1/4 tsp. (1.25 ml) ginger powder
  • 1/2 cup (120 ml) water
  • 1 cup (240 ml) finely powdered skim milk

Note: If the meat weighs either more or less than 5 pounds (2.25 kg), the amount of cure mix applied must be proportional to that weight.  For example, if the weight of the meat is 2 1/2 pounds (1.15 kg), then each ingredient, including the Bradley Cure, needs to be cut in half.

  1. Mix the seasoning, water, and the powdered skim milk in a large bowl until the ingredients are uniform.  (For a normal salt taste, add the optional 1 teaspoon of salt; for a mild salt taste, omit the salt.)
  2. Add the meat to the seasoning mixture.  Knead it until it is well blended -- about 3 minutes. 
  3. Stuff the mixture into the fibrous casings.  Insert the cable probe of an electronic thermometer in the top of one of the sausages, and close the casing around the probe with butcher’s twine. 
  4. Refrigerate the sausage for a few hours, or overnight, to allow the curing agent to migrate to the center of each particle of meat.

Because pastrami is a smoked product, it is logical that this sausage should also be smoked, but smoking is optional.  If you do not intend to smoke the sausage, proceed to the instructions for cooking.

Smoking the sausage in fibrous casing

Remove the stuffed casings from the refrigerator, and place them in a smoker that has been heated to 150° F (65° C).  Maintain this temperature with no smoke until the casings are dry to the touch.  Raise the temperature to 165° F (75° C), and smoke for 3 to 6 hours.  Cook the sausage according to the instructions below. 

Cooking

Wrap each sausage in plastic food wrap (optional).  Twist the ends of the food wrap, and secure the ends with a wire bread-bag tie.  Steam the sausages until the internal temperature is 160° F (71° C).  (A steamer may be improvised by using a large pan with an elevated rack inside; cover with a lid.)

Cooling

Chill the sausage in cold water as soon as the cooking is finished.  Continue chilling until the internal temperature drops below 100° F (38° C).  Refrigerate overnight before using.

Instructions prepared by Warren R. Anderson, author of Mastering the Craft of Smoking Food.

 

 

Salami (Chicken, Pork, Beef, or Wild Game)

There are many kinds of salami.  Most kinds are dry cured for many weeks, and they are neither cooked nor smoked.(In sausage maker’s jargon, dry curing has a special meaning; it means to dry raw sausage under controlled temperature and humidity conditions until the sausage weight has been reduced by a certain percent.)
This product contains ingredients that are common in salamis, but the processing is more like that of bologna; it is not dry cured, and it is fully cooked.

The Casings

Soak fibrous casings in water for 30 minutes prior to using.  Four casings will be required if they are 2 1/2 inches (6.4 cm) in diameter and about 12 inches (30 cm) long.

The Meat

Grind 3 pounds (1362 g) of beef chuck and 2 pounds (908 g) of pork shoulder butt with a 3/16-inch (4.8-mm) plate. 

It is important to note if you wish to try different meat products such as chicken ot tuna, you must include the minced pork to act as the binder

Seasonings and other ingredients for 5 lbs. (2.25 kg)

  • 7 1/2 tsp. (37.5 ml) Bradley Sugar Cure
  • (Do not use more than this amount.)
  • 1 tsp. (5 ml) salt (optional -- see step #1, below)
  • 4 tsp. (20 ml) black peppercorns, cracked
  • 2 tsp. (10 ml) paprika
  • 1 tsp. (5 ml) black pepper, ground
  • 1 tsp. (5 ml) onion powder
  • 1 tsp. (5 ml) garlic powder
  • 1/2 tsp. (2.5 ml) nutmeg
  • 1/2 tsp. (2.5 ml) allspice
  • 1/4 tsp. (1.25 ml) cayenne
  • 2 Tbsp. (30 ml) light corn syrup
  • 1/2 cup (120 ml) water
  • 1 cup (240 ml) finely powdered skim milk

Note: If the meat weighs either more or less than 5 pounds (2.25 kg), the amount of cure mix applied must be proportional to that weight.  For example, if the weight of the meat is 2 1/2 pounds (1.15 kg), then each ingredient, including the Bradley Cure, needs to be cut in half.

  1. Mix the seasoning, water, and the powdered milk in a large bowl until the ingredients are perfectly blended.  (For a normal salt taste, add the optional 1 teaspoon of salt; for a mild salt taste, omit the salt.)
  2. Add the meat to the seasoning mixture and mix thoroughly.  Knead about 3 minutes.
  3. Stuff the sausage mixture into the fibrous casings.  Insert the cable probe of an electronic thermometer in the open end of one of the sausages.  Close the casing around the probe with butcher’s twine. 
  4. Refrigerate the salami overnight. 

Smoking and Cooking

Smoking

Remove the sausage from the refrigerator, and place it in a smoker that has been heated to 150° F (65° C).  Make sure that the damper is fully open while drying the surface.  Maintain this temperature with no smoke until the casing is dry to the touch.  (Alternatively, dry the casing in front of an electric fan.)  Raise the temperature to 160° F (71° C), and smoke the sausage for 3 to 6 hours.  If you wish to cook the sausage in the smoker, raise the temperature to 180° F (82° C) and hot smoke until the internal temperature is 160° F (71° C).  Instead of cooking in the smoker, the sausages may be cooked by steaming, as explained below.

Cooking

After smoking for 3 to 6 hours, raise the temperature of the smoker to  320° F 160° C. for additional 2-3 hours until the internal temperature is 160° F (71° C). 

Cooling

As soon as the cooking is finished, chill the sausage in cold water until the internal temperature drops below 100° F (38° C).  Refrigerate overnight before using. 

Instructions prepared by Warren R. Anderson, author of Mastering the Craft of Smoking Food.

 

 

Smoked Duck

The following instructions are for whole ducks, but the curing and seasoning mixture (below) may be used on wild or domesticated duck breasts as well.  Simply weigh all of the breasts at one time, and apply the appropriate amount of cure to the meat. 
Smoked duck breasts are considered a delicacy in numerous European countries.  The cure mixture used here contains many flavorful seasonings.  The duck, or the duck breasts, will be very tender, and the meat will be perfectly seasoned.  The naturally dark meat of the duck will become an unbelievable maroon color in the finished product.  The meat will titillate the eyes as well as the taste buds. 
NOTE: If a domesticated duck is purchased at a grocery store, be sure to buy a duck that has not been pumped with brine.  If a pumped duck is used, the smoked duck will be much too salty. 

THE CURE AND SEASONING FOR 5 LBS. (2.25 KG) OF DUCK

  • 3 Tbsp. (45 ml) Bradley Sugar Cure
  • (Do not use more than this amount.)
  • 2 tsp. (10 ml) poultry seasoning -- packed in the spoon
  • 2 tsp. (10 ml) onion granules (or powder)
  • 1 tsp. (5 ml) paprika
  • 1 tsp. (5 ml) sage, rubbed -- packed in the spoon
  • 1 tsp. (5 ml) marjoram
  • 1 tsp. (5 ml) thyme
  • 1 tsp. (5 ml) white pepper
  • 1 tsp. (5 ml) garlic granules (or powder)
  • 2 bay leaves, cut into thin strips with scissors (Do not add to the ingredients above.)

Note: If the meat weighs either more or less than 5 pounds (2.25 kg), the amount of cure mix applied must be proportional to that weight.  For example, if the weight of the meat is 2 1/2 pounds (1.15 kg), then each ingredient, including the Bradley Cure, needs to be cut in half.

Day 1

Wash the ducks.  Remove excess fat from around the necks and inside the body cavities.  Leave sufficient skin in the front and back to prevent the flesh from being exposed.  Pierce the ducks well, especially the breasts and legs; use a fork with sharp tines.  Place the ducks in a curing container (a large food container).  Mix the cure thoroughly, and rub it on the birds -- inside and outside.  Sprinkle on the bay leaf, and rub the ducks again.  Place the lid on the curing container.  Cure in the refrigerator for 6 days.  The refrigerator temperature should be set between 34º and 40º F (2.2º to 4.4º C).  Overhaul (rub all surfaces) several times during this period.

Day 6

Rinse the ducks very well with cool water.  Blot them with paper towels.  Stuff the body cavities with crumpled newspaper that has been wrapped in paper towels.  Wrap the whole birds with paper towels, and wrap them again with newspaper.  Put a paper towel and newspaper under the ducks to absorb the water.  Store them in the refrigerator overnight.

Day 7, morning -- Smoking the ducks

  1. Lock the wing tips in place by twisting them behind the shoulder joints.  On the backside, use butcher’s twine to secure the upper part of the wings together
  2. Tie the legs together securely with butcher’s twine.  Use a sturdy metal “S” hook to hang this string on a hanging rod, or pass a hanging rod under this string; this will allow the birds to be hung vertically -- with the tail pointed up.  If the whole birds are hung vertically in the smoke chamber, the smoke can easily flow through the body cavities.  Hanging vertically also allows melted fat to fall freely from the body cavities into a drip tray.  (If you must place the ducks horizontally on a smoking rack, use great care when the ducks are moved; spilling of the hot grease that has accumulated in the body cavities could cause a fire or an injury.)
  3. Dry the birds in the smoker for about 1 hour at 140º F (60º C).  Drying should continue until the skin no longer feels clammy.  However, there may be a little melted fat on the skin.  Do not use smoke during this drying time.
  4. Smoke at the lowest possible temperature for about 3 hours and then smoke at about 150º F (65º C) for 3 hours.  Smoking is complete when the birds have taken on an attractive brownish coloration.  Decrease or increase these smoking times to suit your taste.

  5. Day 7, afternoon or evening -- Cooking the ducks

  6. Preheat the kitchen oven to 350º F (175º C).  Place the ducks on an elevated wire rack in a pan that is at least 1 inch (2.5 cm) deep.  Placement on an elevated wire rack within a pan is important.  The high oven temperature will cause a large amount of grease to collect in the bottom of the pan; if the ducks are not on an elevated rack, the backs of the ducks will be submerged in melted fat. 
  7. Cover each bird with a loose aluminum-foil tent, and roast them until the internal temperature is between 160° F (71° C) and 180° F (82° C).  This will require about 1 1/2 to 2 hours.  Experts on the preparation of duck usually cook the bird until the internal temperature is 160° F (71° C).  Some food safety experts say that the internal temperature should be 180° F (82° C). 
    You might wish to compromise at 170° F (77° C).

Note: If the salt taste is too mild, the next time you make this product, add about 1 teaspoon of salt to the ingredients list.  If the salt taste is too strong, reduce the amount of Bradley Cure by about 1 teaspoon.  Also, a teaspoon of sugar may be added to the list if you like your smoked duck a little sweeter.

Instructions prepared by Warren R. Anderson, author of Mastering the Craft of Smoking Food.

 

Chicken Pastrami

The dark meat of the chicken must be used for chicken pastrami.  The Bradley Cure will fix the red color of the dark chicken meat in the same way that it fixes the red color of beef when beef is cured to make pastrami.  Thighs are best for chicken pastrami.

Pastrami is thoroughly cooked.  Depending on the processor, it is steamed, hot smoked, boiled, oven roasted, or possibly even grilled.  (Hot smoking can cause excessive drying.  Oven roasting, too, can cause excessive drying unless precautions are taken.)

The Thighs

Skinned and boned thighs of the chicken are the best material for making chicken pastrami.  It is very easy to remove the bone from a chicken thigh.  First, lay the thigh skin-side-down on a cutting board.  Locate the bone with your fingers, and make a long slit through the flesh that is on top of the bone.  Stroke along the bone with the tip of the knife.  The flesh will gradually “peel” away from the bone.  Remove the skin. 
Next, rinse with cold water and drain.  Put the meat on paper towels with newspaper underneath to absorb the water that is on the bottom surface.  Blot the top surface with paper towels.  Refrigerate until chilled.

PASTRAMI CURE MIX FOR 5 LBS. (2.5 KG) OF MEAT

  • 3 Tbsp. (45 ml) Bradley Sugar Cure
  • (Do not use more than this amount.)
  • 2 tsp. (10 ml) garlic powder
  • 2 tsp. (10 ml) onion powder
  • 1 tsp. (5 ml) red pepper
  • 1 tsp. (5 ml) white pepper
  • 1 tsp. (5 ml) oregano
  • 1 tsp. (5 ml) paprika
  • 1/2 tsp. (2.5 ml) allspice<
  • 1/2 tsp. (2.5 ml) powdered ginger
  • (A small amount of light corn syrup and coarsely ground pepper are also required.)

Note: If the meat weighs either more or less than 5 pounds (2.25 kg), the amount of cure mix applied must be proportional to that weight.  For example, if the weight of the meat is 2 1/2 pounds (1.15 kg), then each ingredient, including the Bradley Cure, needs to be cut in half.

  1. Weigh the skinned and boned thighs.  If more than one curing container will be used, calculate separately the total weight of the meat that will be placed in each container.  Prepare, calculate, and measure the required amount of curing mixture for each container
  2. Place the meat in the curing container(s).  Rub the cure mix on all surfaces evenly.  Cover, and refrigerate.  The curing time should be one week.  The refrigerator temperature should be set between 34º and 40º F (2.2º to 4.4º C). 
  3. Overhaul the pieces of meat after about 12 hours of curing.  (Overhaul means to rub the surfaces of the meat to redistribute the cure.)  Be sure to wet the meat with any liquid that may have accumulated in the bottom of the curing container.
  4. Overhaul the thighs about every other day until the required curing time (one week) has elapsed.
  5. When the curing is finished, rinse each piece of meat very well in cool water.  Drain in a colander, and blot with a paper towel.
  6. Use a basting brush to “paint” each thigh with light corn syrup, or honey diluted with a little water (this will help the pepper stick to the meat).  Wait for a few minutes until the surface becomes tacky.  Sprinkle and press on coarsely ground pepper. 
  7. Place as many thighs as possible on a paper towel, which has been placed on several layers of newspaper.  Cover this with another paper towel and more newspaper.  On top of this, continue to layer the paper and thighs in the same way.  Refrigerate overnight.

Smoking

  1. Place the cured thighs on smoking racks or in smoking baskets.  Dry at about 140º F (60º C) until the surface is dry (about an hour).  Do not use smoke during the drying period.
  2. To avoid excessive drying and excessively dark coloration, smoke the chicken at less than 85º F (30º C), if possible.  Smoke the chicken pastrami for 3 to 6 hours, depending on how smoky you want the meat.  Raise the temperature to about 145º F (63º C) for an hour or two toward the end of the smoking time if darker coloration is desired. 

Steaming or roasting

The smoked pastrami may be roasted in an oven, or steamed.  In either case, the pastrami is done when the internal temperature is 180° F (82° C).  An aluminum foil tent should be used if the pastrami is cooked in an oven.  If it is steamed, wrap each piece of pastrami in plastic food wrap before steaming, and use an electronic meat thermometer with a cable probe to monitor the internal temperature.  (A steamer may be improvised by using a large pan with an elevated rack inside; cover with a lid.)

Note: If the salt taste is too mild, add about 1 teaspoon of salt to the ingredients list the next time you make chicken pastrami.  If the salt taste is too strong, reduce the amount of Bradley Cure by about 1 teaspoon.

Instructions prepared by Warren R. Anderson, author of Mastering the Craft of Smoking Food.

Sugar Cured Venison Jerkey

The basic processing directions for making either product are the same.  Only the seasoning is different.  Venison or any meat that may contain trichinae, should be heated until the internal temperature is at least 160° F (71° C).
Lean meat, such as venison bottom round or top round, is preferable because fatty meat processed into jerky turns rancid quickly.  Keep in mind that there will be a 40% to 50% weight loss when making jerky.  Ten pounds (4.5 kg) of raw meat will become 5 to 6 pounds (2.25 to 2.75 kg) of jerky.
The following jerky seasoning formulas are not true marinades, and they are not true brines either.  They are somewhere in-between.  Nevertheless, these cures work very well for jerky, and they can be used as models to make countless other jerky seasoning formulas. 
SEASONING FOR 5 LBS. (2.25 KG) OF SLICED MEAT
3 Tbsp. (45 ml) Bradley Cure -- any flavour
(Do not use more than this amount.)
1 tsp. salt
1 tsp cayenne pepper
4 tsp. (20 ml) ginger powder
4 tsp. (20 ml) garlic powder
4 tsp. (20 ml) pepper, black
6 Tbsp. (5 ml) liquid honey-soy marinade
4 Tbsp Cracked Pepper

Note: If the meat weighs either more or less than 5 pounds (2.25 kg), the amount of cure mix applied must be proportional to that weight.  For example, if the weight of the meat is 2 1/2 pounds (1.15 kg), then each ingredient, including the Bradley Cure, needs to be cut in half.
Preparation and seasoning
Begin with hunks of meat, rather than with meat that has been cut into steaks or chops.  (Steaks and chops are cut across the grain of the meat.  This makes them unsuitable for jerky.)  Chill the meat thoroughly.  Cold meat is easier to cut, and bacterial growth is retarded. 
Trim the fat from the meat.  It is impossible to remove the streaks of fat that are marbled into the meat, but you should remove all fat that can be removed easily. 
Use a long slicing knife or an electric meat slicer to slice 1/4 inch (7 mm) thick strips.  The strips should be 1 to 2 inches (2.5 to 5 cm) wide.  The meat must be cut with the grain, not across the grain.  If the meat is cut across the grain, it will be too fragile after it dries.  You can determine if the strip has been correctly cut with the grain by pulling on the ends of the strip.  If it has been properly cut with the grain, the strip will stretch; if not, the muscle fibers will separate, and the strip will tear. 
Chill the meat again while preparing the seasoning mixture.
Stir the seasoning blend well until all ingredients are dissolved.  Chill the mixture well.  Add the meat strips and stir them from time to time, especially during the first few hours of curing.  Refrigerate for 2-3 days stirring occasionally. 

Drying and smoking the jerky
Place the strips on smoker racks, or lay the strips in wire-mesh smoking baskets.  (Wire-mesh baskets are preferable; hanging the strips will allow more of the product to be processed, but the use of baskets makes processing easier and faster.)  A thermometer is not required for beef, pork, or any other kind of meat if the suggested high temperatures and long processing times are followed.  You may use a common smoker with a heat source inside.  To facilitate drying, the smoker chimney damper should be fully open.
Dry at 140º F (60º C) with no smoke until the surface is dry.  This will require at least one hour.  If the strips are on wire mesh, turn them over after 30 to 45 minutes to prevent sticking. 
Raise temperature to 160º F (71º C), and smoke for 2 or 3 hours with Hickory Bisquettes.
Raise temperature to 175º F (80º C) and continue to dry with no smoke until done.  This final drying and cooking step will require about three hours.  When the jerky is done, it will be about half the thickness of the raw jerky, and it will appear to have lost about 50% of its weight.  The jerky will not snap when it is bent, but a few of the muscle fibers will fray.  If the jerky is dried until it snaps when it is bent, the jerky will have a longer shelf life, but it will not be as tasty.  Let the jerky cool to room temperature, and either freeze or refrigerate it. 

Note: If the salt taste is too mild, the next time you make this product, add about 1 teaspoon of salt to the ingredients list.  If the salt taste is too strong, reduce the amount of Bradley Cure by about 1 teaspoon.